cordjefferson:

Had you any idea that Emmett Till’s final words were some of boldest in American history?

Milam: “You still as good as I am?”
Till: “Yeah.”
Milam: “You still ‘had’ white women?”
Till: “Yeah.”

Keep in mind that that’s after two grown men had tortured him for hours. Milam would later say that, following that exchange, he had no choice but to kill the 14-year-old boy:

"Well, what else could we do? He was hopeless. I’m no bully; I never hurt a nigger in my life. I like niggers—in their place—I know how to work ‘em. But I just decided it was time a few people got put on notice. As long as I live and can do anything about it, niggers are gonna stay in their place. Niggers ain’t gonna vote where I live. If they did, they’d control the government. They ain’t gonna go to school with my kids. And when a nigger gets close to mentioning sex with a white woman, he’s tired o’ livin’. I’m likely to kill him. Me and my folks fought for this country, and we got some rights. I stood there in that shed and listened to that nigger throw that poison at me, and I just made up my mind. ‘Chicago boy,’ I said, ‘I’m tired of ‘em sending your kind down here to stir up trouble. Goddam you, I’m going to make an example of you—just so everybody can know how me and my folks stand.’"

"I feel personally sorrowful about black-white relations a lot of the time because black people have always been used as a buffer in this country between powers to prevent class war, to prevent other kinds of real conflagrations.
If there were no black people here in this country, it would have been Balkanized. The immigrants would have torn each other’s throats out, as they have done everywhere else. But in becoming an American, from Europe, what one has in common with that other immigrant is contempt for me — it’s nothing else but color. Wherever they were from, they would stand together. They could all say, ”I am not that.” So in that sense, becoming an American is based on an attitude: an exclusion of me.
It wasn’t negative to them — it was unifying. When they got off the boat, the second word they learned was ”nigger.” Ask them — I grew up with them. I remember in the fifth grade a smart little boy who had just arrived and didn’t speak any English. He sat next to me. I read well, and I taught him to read just by doing it. I remember the moment he found out that I was black — a nigger. It took him six months; he was told. And that’s the moment when he belonged, that was his entrance. Every immigrant knew he would not come as the very bottom. He had to come above at least one group — and that was us."

- Toni Morrison, on bridging the abyss between sexes, classes, and races. (via howtobeterrell)

(via generalbriefing)

(Source: blackourstory)

"'If you seek small things to do, and do them well, great things will seek you, and demand to be performed.'"

- (via idriesshah)

(via idriesshah)

gallifreyglo:

securelyinsecure:

Throwback - Celebrities Recreate Iconic Covers for Ebony Magazine’s 65th Anniversary (2010)

To celebrate its 65th anniversary issue and icons of the past and present, EBONY magazine asked their favorite entertainers to pose in modern-day recreations of those covers for a one-of-a-kind look back at the past.

Featuring: Regina King (as Eartha Kitt), Mary J. Blige (as Diana Ross), Nia Long (as Dorothy Dandridge), John Legend (as Duke Ellington), Lamman Rucker (as Richard Roundtree), Taraji P. Henson (as Diahann Carroll), Blair Underwood (as Sidney Poitier), Jurnee Smollett (as Lena Horne), Usher Raymond (as Sammy Davis, Jr.), and Samuel L. Jackson (as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), among others.

Love this!

(Source: straightfromthea.com, via esinahs)

"

The ignorance of Black freedom movements is so profound that even anarchistic tendencies within them get ignored. Nat Turner led a slave uprising in 1831 that killed over fifty whites and struck terror throughout the South; it should clearly count as one of the most important insurrections in American history. Historians often describe William Lloyd Garrison, a leader of the abolitionist movement, as a “Christian Anarchist” (e.g. Perry 1973), yet he is almost never included in anarchist-produced histories. The Black-led Reconstruction government in South Carolina from 1868-1874, which Du Bois dubbed the “South Carolina Commune,” did far more toward building socialism than the Paris Commune in 1871 ever did. Ella Baker’s anti-authoritarian critique of Martin Luther King Jr. encouraged young civil rights workers to create their own autonomous and directly democratic organization, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), arguably the most important direct action civil rights group. Further, the racial consciousness produced by these struggles has often been broader, radical, and international than the consciousness produced by other U.S. struggles, even if it describes itself as “nationalist” (See Robin Kelley’s great book Freedom Dreams for more on this). Yet these persons and events curiously form no part of the anarchist scene’s historical tradition. [4]

In sum, the Black freedom struggles have been the most revolutionary tradition in American history yet the anarchist scene is all but unaware of it. I suggest that there is more to learn about anarchism in the U.S. from Harriet Tubman, Abby Kelley, Nate Shaw, Malcolm X, W.E.B. Du Bois, Ella Baker, Fannie Lou Hamer, James Forman, Angela Davis and Assata Shakur than from Proudhoun, Kropotkin, Bakunin, Berkman or Goldman. There is more to learn from abolitionism than Haymarket, more from Reconstruction than the Spanish Civil War, more from the current social conditions of Black America than the global South. To see this, however, requires modifying the critique of hierarchy so that it can explain how forms of domination are themselves organized. It requires abandoning the infoshops and insurrection models for a commitment to building movements. It requires looking to Mississippi and New Orleans more than Russia or Paris.

"

-

Between Infoshops and Insurrection U.S. Anarchism, Movement Building, and the Racial Order By Joel Olson

(via whitedenial-ontrial)

YES YES YES THIS IS WHAT I’M SAYING.

(via so-treu)

oh wow. I remember Asma talking about him in Intro to Politics. Maybe Chris Coggins too. 

Were the mysterious circumstances of his  sudden death ever resolved?

(via whitedevilsophistry)

hoooooooooooly shit. i did not know he had died, like that.

O_O

(via so-treu)

(Source: harperisafairy, via blackourstory)